Posted in 2022 Lent Devotions

The Mirror of the Passion

Photo by Alex Motoc on Unsplash

I stumbled a theme for this year’s Lent devotions in this tweet:

“Hard to believe Judas would betray Jesus for 30 pieces of silver, unlike the rest of us who would do it for free.”

If we’re honest, we can see ourselves in many of the people in the cast of the passion of our Lord. From Judas to Peter to a crowd demanding Barabbas be freed, it’s like looking in a mirror. I can see myself, or at least a part of myself, in all of them. So this year I’ll look in the mirror of the passion, step into their shoes and meditate on the rejection, suffering and death of Jesus.

The incarnation of Jesus means he interacted with people just like us. Moms and dads raising families, people going to work, soldiers keeping the peace, vendors with booths in the marketplace, scribes studying the law, and priests serving at the temple all encountered Jesus. Some watched him from a distance. Others slapped him. A few questioned him. A handful asked for his help. Demons shrieked in his presence. Many were healed.

We casually claim, “God knows everything.” He’s omniscient. We forget that part of that knowing is experiential. He was here. He saw, heard and felt what we do. He knows what it feels like to be frustrated, exhausted, incredulous, attacked, and humiliated. He also knows what it’s like to celebrate, enjoy good food, spend time with friends, and hold a child in his arms. Yes, he knows.

And he knows me. He made me. He knows the number of my days and the number of hairs on my head. I’m not just a number; he knows my name. He knows the desire of my heart. He knows what I can do well and what I’ll never be able to do. He knows my sin.

As I see a reflection of myself in the people of the passion in Luke’s gospel, I’ll not doubt learn more about myself, both good and bad. But I’ll learn more about my relationship with Jesus, too. Thanks in advance for walking in their shoes with me.

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